Shroud of turin carbon dating controversy

In 1532, there was a fire in the church in Chambery, France, where the Shroud was being kept.

Part of the metal storage case melted and fell on the cloth, leaving burns, and efforts to extinguish the fire left water stains. In 1534, nuns sewed patches over the fire-damaged areas and attached a full-size support cloth to the back of the Shroud. The Shroud was moved to Turin in 1578, where it remains to this day.

It displays the complete dorsal and frontal image of a severely abused and crucified individual of Semitic characteristics who was laid on the proximal portion of the cloth with the distal portion folded over the head and extended over the body thus creating, through some as yet unexplained chemical or physical process, two "head to head" images of the back and front.

The Shroud of Turin is a centuries old linen cloth that bears the image of a crucified man.

Below is a summary of scientific and historical evidence supporting the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin as the ancient burial cloth of the historical Jesus of Nazareth. Michael Fischer, adapted from the original article by John C.

Iannone THE SHROUD AS AN ANCIENT TEXTILE The Shroud is a linen cloth woven in a 3-over-1 herringbone pattern, and measures 14'3" x 3'7".

A man that millions believe to be Jesus of Nazareth.

One of the specialists was Swiss textile historian Mechthild Flury-Lemberg.Before leaving the papacy, Benedict XVI approved a special broadcast of the shroud to be held at the Turin Cathedral, where the cloth is preserved in a climate-controlled case.And for those who want an even more intimate examination of the cloth, a new mobile app, Shroud 2.0, was just released on Good Friday (March 29), reports.It features 24 hours of battery life and claims to be a 'mini-disco on the move'. The Shroud of Turin, an icon of faith and controversy among Christians, is back in the news.

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